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The ChurchCare eBulletin comes out three times a year and features news, events, guidance, advice and updates. To receive the eBulletin visit our home page and sign up via the newsletter sign-up tool in the bottom right-hand corner.


 

The Heritage Lottery Funded Bats in Churches project is recruiting a public engagement specialist to assist project staff and the project steering group with audience identification, access, learning activity and engagement planning for the development phase of this project. The main outcome of this Contract is to enable the delivery phase bid to be submitted in March 2018 (round 2). This is an exciting opportunity to work with the newly appointed project team to help develop this hugely important bid. Natural England are the project lead and applications should be made through their online system (the job is displayed under current opportunities). The deadline for applications is 23rd June. The full job specification can be found here.

Bishop Nicholas responds to American withdrawal from global agreement to fight climate change  

Bishop Nicholas, as the Church of England’s lead bishop on the environment, the Bishop of Salisbury, has condemned President Trump’s decision to revoke the United States’ ratification of the Paris Agreement on climate change, which has been signed by 194 other countries.

Bishop Nicholas said, “I am, frankly, very disturbed by President Trump’s decision to revoke the United States’ commitment to the Paris Agreement, which was a global commitment made in good faith.

“Climate change is one of the great challenges of our times. There is a moral and spiritual dimension with a strong consensus built among the faith communities about the care of our common home. The scientific, economic and political arguments point in the same direction.

“How can President Trump look in the eye the people most affected, including the world’s poorest in the places most affected by climate change now, and those affected by increasingly frequent extreme weather in parts of the USA? The leader of what used to be called ‘the new world’ is trapped in old world thought and action.

“President Trump has not recognised the economic potential of renewable energy which represents a paradigm shift capable of generating sustainable prosperity. What will our children and grandchildren say to us about the way we respond to this extreme carelessness?

“Ours is the first generation which cannot say we did not know about the human impact on climate change.

“For the US government to withdraw from taking responsible action in keeping with the Paris agreement is an abject failure of leadership. The USA emits nearly a fifth of global CO2 emissions. This step is particularly disappointing at a time when China, the world’s other mega-emitter of CO2, has committed to deep and sustained cuts in emissions to protect its own citizens as well as the rest of the world.

“In challenging President Trump’s decision, ‘We the people’, including churches and other faith leaders, must speak clearly: this decision is wrong for the USA and for the world. I commend those American churches and faith leaders who are speaking out and organising against this decision.

“How out of touch President Trump is with many of his own people was shown yesterday, when the Church of England helped lead a consortium of shareholders with $5 trillion of assets under management at the ExxonMobil AGM. A motion was passed overwhelmingly forcing the company to undertake and disclose analysis of what limiting climate change to 2C would mean for its business.

“Shareholders can make a difference. So can citizens and electors.

“I warmly welcomed our UK government’s rapid ratification of the Paris Agreement and I trust that the UK cross-party consensus that climate change is a real and urgent problem will remain committed and strong throughout the Brexit process.”

The CBC has been working with several dioceses and a number of national partners including Historic England, the University of York and Atlantic Geomatics to develop the software and survey methodology to create digital plans of our churchyards and cemeteries (and everything within them, including buildings) which is compatible with the Church Heritage Record and Online Faculty System. This would allow parishes to better manage their churchyards and if they wish their buildings, with a live online record which they can use and update. The offer has a cost depending on several factors, but we are working on reducing this to a minimum, or nothing for the initial survey; obviously critical mass is the key in this regard. Having an accurate plan is also useful for attracting visitors and interest in the memorials and ecology of a churchyard.

If you are interested in this project, tentatively called the Burial Grounds of England Survey, then please put in your diaries the following dates, when we will be holding free launch events. These will be held at London Waterloo St John, 13th June, and York St Michael-le-Belfry, 23rd June, both from 10-16.00, sandwich lunch and refreshments provided. Contact This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you wish to register or know more.

The Heritage Lottery Fund has announced major changes to the way in which churches apply for funding, including the closure of the Grants for Places of Worship scheme later this year.

ChurchCare has produced a briefing document to guide dioceses and parishes as to our position on these changes and suggested next steps. We will update this as matters progress.

Existing applications should not be affected. Anyone concerned should contat their local HLF representative.